CO 042: IMPACT OF AN ANTIBIOTIC POLICY ON ANTIMICROBIAL CONSUMPTION AT COMANDANTE MANUEL FAJARDO UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, 2011

J Pharm Pharmacogn Res 2(Suppl. 1): S23, 2014

Special supplement with the abstract book of LATINFARMA 2013

Oral Communication

CO 042: IMPACT OF AN ANTIBIOTIC POLICY ON ANTIMICROBIAL CONSUMPTION AT COMANDANTE MANUEL FAJARDO UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, 2011

Morejón M, Tirado J, Jiménez A, Mulen M.

Hospital Universitario “Cmdte. Manuel Fajardo”, Zapata y D, Vedado, La Habana, Cuba. E-mail: moisesm@infomed.sld.cu
Abstract

Introduction: At present, it is unanimous among scientists that the use of antibiotics, specifically their misuse, is the most significant factor in the emergence and development of bacterial resistance. Today, over 50% of hospitalized patients receive antibiotics; it is considered that 25-50% is unnecessary. This has concerned all levels. That is why; the WHO issued a document in 2001: “Strategies to contain antimicrobial resistance,” which states in its first page that the main cause of bacterial resistance is the inappropriate use of antimicrobials. Therefore, one of its recommendations calls for the creation of antibiotic policies and monitoring their consumption in all health institutions.

Objectives: To determine how the patterns of antimicrobial prescriptions vary with the application of an antibiotic policy.

Results: There was a variation of consumption in the cephalosporin family, which was further used; cefuroxime was the highest consumed, three times more than ceftriaxone, whereas cefazolin was only used in surgical prophylaxis, and cefepime was only used in the intensive care units. meropenem and piperazicillina/tazolbactam were only used on serious case in the care units.

Conclusions: The patterns of prescription of antimicrobial drugs met favorably the recommended guidelines for the policy of antibiotics use, which could promote a more rational use of them.